Art Rant: A Wordy and Overwrought Manifesto

These  principles are meant to act as a guide to create  an environment  which encourages, inspires,  and sustains truth, understanding, community, and the actualization of art. If transparency and vulnerability are fundamental to verbal communication, then how much more in art?

  1. The  act of  creation  is  the state of  being closest  to presently  experiencing  the world  in which we live. Creating art is communion in its purest form. In actively making art, one can more fully understand the work of others and the  motives behind others’ work. The act of making  and  analyzing  art  can  make  one  more perceptive  to  and  understanding  of another’s  worldview  and  personal  story. Critically viewing and discussing art can result in supporting  and  encouraging conversation, understanding, and community on a local and global level.

  2. In creating we both  experience and interpret our world. We find ourselves caught in the tension  of  making  and  receiving,  which  is  central  to  community  and human  life. At the junction of experience and interpretation, we can accept our surroundings for what they truly are.  We can  then  examine  them  in  order  to contribute  to  our  environment  in  a  positive, constructive way.

  3. When  one is actively  creating, one is  more  able  to  see  the beauty of  the  world in which we  live. Through experience and examination, we engage with Creation and closely examine its intricacies and structures, and can be open to its awe-inspiring forces.

  4. Symbols  and  innuendo  can  be  misinterpreted. Preconceptions  can be blinding. Context  and  meaning  are  often  lost  in  translation. Art as a  layering  of explicit  visual  language  is  an  experiment  in  facilitating mutual understanding. The formal design elements and a record of process are indispensable tools for organizing ideas  and  interpretations  into  a  symbolic  language  which connects with  the  human  spirit and invites the viewer to participate and engage with the act of creation.

  5. Whenever possible, art should be treated as a service and not as a product. Art is better appreciated and of more value to a society when it is perceived as experiential rather than as a commodity.

 

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Destruction & Ownership: Where is the line drawn?

DIAS

Destruction has been recognized as an accepted element of fine art since the 1950s, in part thanks to the international Destructivist art movement in the 1950s and early 1960s, and the Destruction in Art Symposium (DIAS) in 1966. The movement aimed “to focus attention on the element of destruction in Happenings and other art forms, and to relate this destruction in society” (July 1966 DIAS press release) in reaction to the overwhelming violence of the twentieth century, in particularly the horrors of the Holocaust and World War II. Artists commented on violence and destruction through destructive performances (such as Raphael Montañez Ortiz demolishing a piano at the symposium itself) and using destructive means on canvas within the context of painting.

Continue reading Destruction & Ownership: Where is the line drawn?

Lust for Life: Die Brücke and Contemporary Printmaking

nude4

Countless different styles of art emerged in the revolutionary and high-energy early 20th-century Europe. Though many of the once radical ideas, credos, and art movements have lost their edge in the last century, the bold and in-your-face style and subject matter of the Die Brücke group remains nearly as fresh and confrontational as it did 110 years ago.

Continue reading Lust for Life: Die Brücke and Contemporary Printmaking